Gardening Tips

The Following Plants Are Rabbit Resistant:

Acanthus
Aconitum
Alchemilla
Anemone
Aquilegia
Aster
Astilbe
Brunnera
Clematis
Convallaria
Gorydalis
Crocosmia
Dahlia
Delphinium
Digitalis
Doronicum
Epimedium
Eupatorium
Euphorbia
Geranium
Helenium
Helianthus
Helleborus
Hemerocallis
Hosta
Houttuynia
Iris
Lamium
Lavatera
Liriope
Lupinus
Lysimachia
Malva
Miscanthus
Narcissus
Nepeta

Deer Resistant Plants

No plants are totally safe against deer browsing. Plants that have textures or smells that are not as palable will discourage the deer from foraging on their leaves. The following list will help you to select items based on Good (rarely eaten) Medium (occasionally eaten) and Poor (often eaten) categories.

Good Resistance:

Annuals

Ageratum
Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
Canna
Catharanthus (Flowering Vinca)
Cleome
Helichrysum (Strawflower/
Licorice Vine)
Heliotrope
Hypoestes (Polka Dot)
Ipomoea (Morning Glory)
Lantana
Lobularia (Sweet Alyssum)
Nicotiana
Ocimum (Basil)
Ornamental Grasses/Phormium
Petroselinum (Parsley)
Rosmarinus (Rosemary)
Salvia farinacea (Blue Salvia)
Senecio (Dusty Miller)
Tagetes (Marigold)
Verbena

Perennials/ Hardy Bulbs

Acanthus (Bear’s Breeches)
Achillea (Yarrow)
Aconitum (Monkshood)
Acorus (Sweetflag)
Aegopodium (Bishop’s Weed)
Agastache (Hyssop)
Ajuga
Alchemilla (Lady’s Mantle)
Allium (Onions, Chives, etc.)
Anemone
Aquilegia (Columbine)
Artemisia
Aruncus (Goat’s Beard)
Asarum (Ginger)
Asclepias (Butterfly Weed)
Astilbe
Athyrium (Painted Fern)
Baptisia (False Indigo)
Bergenia
Brunnera
Camassia (Quamash)
Centaurea (Bachelor’s Button)
Cerastium (Snow in Summer)
Ceratostigma (Plumbago)
Chelone (Turtlehead)
Cimicifuga (Bugbane)
Clematis
Colchicum (Autumn Crocus)
Convallaria (Lily of the Valley)
Coreopsis
Corydalis
Crocosmia
Cyrtomium (Holly Fern)
Dicentra (Bleeding Heart)
Digitalis (Foxglove)
Echinacea
Epimedium
Eranthis (Winter Aconite)
Heuchera
Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed)
Euphorbia
Filipendula (Queen of the Prairie)
Fritillaria (Crown Imperial)
Galanthus (Snowdrop)
Geum
Gypsophila (Baby’s Breath)
Helenium (Helen’s Flower)
Helleborus (Lenten Rose)
Hyacinth
Iberis (Candytuft)
Lamium/Lamiastrum
Lavandula (Lavender)
Leucanthemum (Shasta Daisy)
Liatris (Gayfeather)
Ligularia
Linum (Flax)
Lupinus
Lychnis (Rose Campion)
Lythrum (Loosestrife)
Matteuccia (Ostrich Fern)
Mentha (Mint)
Monarda (BeeBalm)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Myosotis (Forget Me Not)
Narcissus (Daffodil)
Nepeta (Catmint)
Oenothera (Evening
Primrose)
Origanum (Oregano)
Ornamental Grasses
Osmunda (Cinnamon Fern)
Pachysandra
Paeonia (Peony)
Papaver (Poppy)
Perovskia (Russian Sage)

Perennials (cont)

Platycodon (Balloon
Flower)
Polemonium (Jacob’s
Ladder)
Pulmonaria (Lungwort)
Pyrethrum (Painted Daisy)
Salvia (Meadow Sage)
Santolina (Lavender-
Cotton)
Scabiosa (Pin-cushion)
Scilla (Squill)
Solidago (Goldenrod)
Stachys (Lamb’s Ear)
Tanacetum (Tansy)
Thymus (Thyme)
Tiarella (Foamflower)
Verbascum (Mullein)
Veronica (Speedwell)
Vinca (Myrtle)

Trees & Shrubs

Aronia (Chokeberry)
Berberis (Barberry)
Betula (Birch)
Buddleia (Butterfly Bush)
Buxus (Boxwood)
Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
Calluna (Heather)
Caryopteris (Blue Mist)
Chamaecyparis (Cypress)
Clethra
Cornus (Dogwood)
Cratageus (Hawthorn)
Daphne
Deutzia
Erica (Heath)
Fagus (Beech)
Forsythia
Ginkgo
Gleditsia (Honey Locust)
Ilex glabra (Ink berry)
Juniper
Kalmia (Mt. Laurel)
Kolkwitzia (Beautybush)
Leucothoe
Lonicera (Honeysuckle)
Magnolia (Saucer, Star)
Microbiota (Siberian
Cypress)
Myrica (Bayberry)
Picea (Spruce)
Pieris
Pinus (Pine, not White)
Spiraea
Syringa (Lilac)
Viburnum
Wisteria
Yucca

Medium Resistance:

Annuals

Alocasia (Elephant’s Ear)
Anethum (Dill)
Begonia
Caladium
Celosia
Cosmos
Medium
Resistance:
Caladium
Cyclamen
Dahlia
Dianthus
Gazania
Gerbera
Gladiolus
Helianthus (Sunflower)
Lobelia
Osteospermum
Pansy
Perilla
Pelargonium (Geranium)
Petunia
Scaevola
Tropaeolum (Nasturtium)
Viola
Zinnia

Perennials
Armeria (Sea Thrift)
Aster
Bellis (English Daisy)
Campanula
Chrysanthemum
Clematis

Perennials (cont)

Delphinium
Dianthus
Erigeron (Fleabane)
Eryngium (Sea Holly)
Gaillardia (Blanket Flower)
Galium (Sweet Woodruff)
Gaura
Geranium (‘Biokova’ only)
Hedera (Ivy)
Hibiscus
Hypericum (St. John’s Wort)
Iris
Kniphofia (Red Hot Poker)
Lilium
Lobelia (Cardinal Flower)
Lychnis (Maltese Cross)
Lysimachia
Penstemon
Phlox (any)
Physostegia (Obedient Plant)
Primula (Primrose)
Saponaria (Soapwort)
Sedum
Sempervivum (Hens &
Chicks)
Sidalcea (Checkermallow)
Solidago (Goldenrod)
Stokesia (Stoke’s Aster)
Thalictrum (Meadow Rue)
Tiarella (Foam Flower)
Tradescantia (Spiderwort)
Tricyrtis (Toad Lily)
Trollius (Globe Flower)

Trees & Shrubs

Abies (Concolor Fir)
Acer (Maple)
Aesculus (Buckeye)
Amelanchier (Serviceberry)
Campsis (Trumpet Vine)
Cotinus (Smokebush)
Cotoneaster
Hamamelis (Witchhazel)
Hibiscus (Rose of Sharon)
Hydrangea
Hypericum (St. John’s Wort)
Ilex (Blue, Winterberry, etc.)
Kerria
Ligustrum (Privet)
Magnolia (most)
Metasequoia (Dawn
Redwood)
Philadelphus (Mock Orange)
Potentilla
Prunus (Jap. Flowering)
Pyrus (Flowering Pear)
Quercus (Oak)
Rhododendron
Rosa (Rugosa or Landscape
types, not Hybrids)
Salix (Willows)
Tilia (Linden)
Tsuga (Hemlock)
Weigela

Poor Resistance:

Annuals
Impatiens
Tulips

Perennials
Alcea (Hollyhock)
Geranium (most)
Fragaria (Strawberry)
Hemerocallis (Daylily)
Hosta
Rudbeckia (Black-eyed
Susan)

Trees & Shrubs
Abies (most Fir, except
Concolor)
Azalea
Cercis (Redbud)
Euonymus
Malus (Apples)
Prunus (Plums, Cherries)
Rosa (Hybrids)
Taxus (Yew)
Thuja (Arborvitae)

Deer Deterrent Tips:

  • Deer are habitable animals, they tend to return to best feeding areas and bring friends!
  • Resistant plant selection, coupled with barriers (such as fences) should be your first line of defense.
  • Motion detection sprinklers and/or frightening techniques can be effective.
  • Spray repellents such as: Liquid Fence, have been shown to work well in our area. Granular applications of: Deer Scram plus Shake Away can stretch out the times between re-application.
  • Surrounding low resistance plants with good resistant plants or planting not-so-resistant items near the house will minimize damage.
  • Heavy deer damage is evident in winters of freezing cold and accumulating snows that last. Severe grazing also occurs in spring, when new growth appears and deer are starving. In this case – no plants are immune.
  • As more homes are built in your area, more people taking over the wilderness areas. Deer have less food choices and are more likely to feed on less desirable plants to survive.

CONTAINER GARDENING 101

Container Gardening has become one of the most popular forms of gardening. Not only is it less work than bed gardening, but it’s great for those who live in apartments or have second homes. Nothing dresses up a deck or area like a splash of flower power.

Whether you are looking for something a little different or the classics we offer hundreds of varieties of new, unique and hard to find annuals

tips-1

Pick plants that are compatible, pay attention to their light and moisture requirements, height and growing habits and colors. Make sure to use a good quality potting soil like Baccto and use a container with good drainage. Most of all use your imagination and have fun!!!

Here are some suggestions:

We recommend using 14″ containers for the following combinations.

bugs-of-summerNot sure what’s bugging you? Bring a sample of the damaged plant along with you to our store so we can help you correctly diagnose the problem and offer a solution.

 
SYMPTOM PLANT & INSECT CURE
Type of sap dripping from leaves, presence
of insect.
Aphids- Tiny white/lime green suckling insect found primarily on flowering house plants.
Hi-Yield Systemic Insect Granules, Fertilome Triple Action Plus 
Large holes in leaves. Slugs & Snails- Like cool moist areas, particularly shade plants like Hostas. Feed at night.
Sluggo, Hi-Yield Slug and Snail Bait,
Leaves are chewed away; hard-shelled beetles can be found on the plant and burrowed into flowers. The grubs will feed on roots of grasses and vegetables.
Japanese Beetles – Adults are known to damage more than 200 types of plants as well as your lawn. Hi Yield Grub Free Zone, Fertilome Carbaryl Garden Spray, Fertilome Borer and Bagworm Spray
Brownish/green winged insects on plants
often in pairs. Can cause holes on foliage.
Rose Chafer- Unlike its’ name suggest, these insects infest all types of plants. Usually most noticeable in June. Infestation is short lived usually about three weeks. Some people choose to let Rose Chafers go away on their own but if damage to the plant is present, Fertilome Carbaryl Garden Spray also works well. 

The Good Dirt…
The Quality of the soil in your container gardens and flower or
vegetable beds makes one of the biggest differences between dud garden and dream garden…

Containers should be replanted with new potting soil every spring.

The Soils main function is to supply nutrients, including water to your plant. Soil that is reused has been leeched of these nutrients and water

retention qualities. Beware of the ingredients of your Potting Soil. A quality potting soil will actually be a soil-less mix. Cheap potting soil can contain up to 70% topsoil and sand, which have virtually no
nutrients and plenty of weed seeds. We recommend soil-less brands such as BACCTO or FAFARD. It is also a good idea to mix in a time release fertilizer such as OSMOCOTE when preparing your container. This fertilizer will provide your plants with the nutrients they need to blossom and grow through out the season.

Unfortunately, Mother Nature rarely provides the nutrients needed to maintain a healthy garden year after year. For sandy soils, try mixing in Sphagnum Peat Moss for added water retention. Cow Manure and Compost can help add nutrients to your beds. We also have a product that contains a mixture of peat moss, cow manure and topsoil, called Fafard Complete Planting Mix. This product can be added to improve the quality of your beds with out the labor of mixing soils. Mixing in a organic fertilizer like Espoma will improve the quality of your soil while fertilizing throughout the season. Espoma can be added as a dressing to established perennial beds as well. This can be done at anytime including early spring.

Unlike chemical fertilizer, organic fertilizer contains micronutrients and trace elements and will not leech out in soil under 50 degrees.

Stop by for more information or advice on getting the best out of your garden by using… Good Dirt.

In the Fall, make sure your plants have gone dormant before you cut them back. (That way they have sent all there nutrients back to the roots.) Plants like Hollyhocks, Delphiniums and Perennials Hibiscus may not over winter if they are cut back to soon.


Every time you water you are washing nutrients away from your plant. Fertilizer Annuals often to make up for this. We use Jacks Classics 20-20-20. You should too. 


SHOP LOCAL – HELP YOUR NEIGHBOR

For every $1.00 you spend at a local family owned business .45 cents is re-invested locally. Compare that to the .15 cents the corporate chain spends in your community.


GROW YOUR OWN-HELP THE CHILDREN

Teaching children about gardening is good for their body, soul and mind!! More than ever before children need the exercise, they need to reconnect with nature and know where their food comes from and how it is grown.


GROW YOUR OWN –

Did you know that gardening can burn up to 460 calories an hour?? Not to mention the peace you feel after connecting with the earth. And the nutrients from a home grown product do not compare to one that has just traveled 750 miles.



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